Feminist Claims That Women Who Dress Girly Are Victims Of Patriarchy, Gets Quickly Shut Down

There is a never-ending dialogue about patriarchy and the impact it has on society’s definition of femininity and masculinity. Some people believe that acting and dressing ‘girly’ is actually a result of patriarchal oppression and a long history of men telling women to dress and look a certain way. However, other times it can simply be the preference of a woman just wanting to wear a dress, a feel comfortable in a style that fits into the traditional mold of femininity.

Recently, artist Kiana Mcmillian received a lot of attention online after sharing one of her illustrations on her blog

Image credits: Kiana McMillian

This is not the first time Kiana has shared some of her work online. the artist already has a blog dedicated to her art where she shares all kinds of adorable illustrations. But out of all her work, this image illustrating her changing style while growing up has sparked the biggest debate.

One user quickly declared that women who dress girly are victims of patriarchy

It is a recurring issue in today’s society for people to judge others based on what they wear. It is often understood that a woman who prefers to wear dresses, makeup and spend more time on their appearance might be doing so because of a long history of patriarchy and men telling woman that they need to look a certain way, a way that pleases them.

But Kiana was not having it, she quickly responded to these claims by explaining why women should be allowed to wear whatever they want

Another user also responded by saying that some women are afraid to look feminine because they are shamed for being too girly

With over 177,000 reblogs the post quickly went viral with people supporting Kiana and saying that every woman should be allowed to dress however they want, without others judging them for their decision.

Many people came to Kiana’s defense

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